Dr. Ryan Polselli Focuses on Detection and Early Diagnosis of Breast Lesions and Cancers

Ryan Polselli
Ryan Polselli

As a member and Diplomate of the American Board of Radiology and a Certified Clinical Densitometrist (an individual who has passed a standardized testing process in bone densitometry for evaluating DXA, or dual energy X-ray absorptiometry), Ryan J. Polselli M.D. and Radiologist has turned his talents toward the detection and early diagnosis of breast lesions and cancers.  Ryan Polselli is today the Breast Imaging professional and General Radiologist at Global Imaging Specialists of Florida and Illinois.

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As the founder and CEO of MammoLink®, a professional team of experts in mammography who work with OB-Gyn and general practitioner physicians in the United States to make mammography services available to patients in the office, Ryan Polselli aims to significantly improve patient care.  Access to the best breast cancer screening compliance satisfies the needs of patients.  It also redirects the revenue stream back to its source; the direct contact between patients and doctors.  MammoLink® allows physicians to choose and customize the MammoLink® options which will work for their offices and their patients.

MammoLink® assures that services, technicians and equipment is in compliance both statewide and federally, while state-of-the-art 3D digital mammography units are installed and immediately available in physician’s offices.

Also Read : Ryan Polselli: The Case for Better Breast Cancer Screening and Diagnosis

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Ryan Polselli M.D. Brings Genius with Radiology to Bear for Individual Patients

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Ryan Polselli, M.D. and Radiologist, has formed a company and service which fulfills a vital need for physicians and their patients with a minimum of stress and work.  Polselli’s MammoLink® presents only the finest equipment in the world for women’s imaging.  Similarly, MammoLink® retains leading United States’ experts in mammography with a minimum of 5 years in radiology after their medical school training.  In addition, at least one additional year is required by MammoLink® in fellowship training for breast imaging in an accredited US institution.  With MammoLink® technicians and technology, physicians and patients have instant results for their imaging studies during their office visits.  Patients and physicians have the advantage of timely consultation and interpretation.

Dr. Ryan Polselli perceived, through his own years of experience as a physician and radiologist, that the process of mammography was full of anxiety and inefficiency, removed as it was from the immediate vicinity of their physician’s office and from his or her care.  Additionally, mammography imaging equipment was sometimes substandard and sometimes painful for women.  Polselli’s brainchild, MammoLink®, brings the finest equipment and technical expertise to the doctor’s office.  MammoLink® eliminates the need for separate appointments, a trip to a distant imaging facility and the need to wait for imaging results.

For more details visit here  – https://www.mammolink.com/

Ryan Polselli: What Makes an Entrepreneur Successful?

Ryan Polselli

Ryan Polselli is the CEO and founder of MammoLink, which started its successful run as a limited liability company in Palm Harbor, Florida by securing two provisional patents for medical devices created to decrease the number of medical errors in the field of breast imaging. Doctors can miss all kinds of information leading to unnecessary medical complications. Dr. Polselli saw a need for a new way of detecting early warning signs of cancer.

Since he founded MammoLink, Ryan Polselli has been successful in his industry because he never wavered from the vision and the impetus that originally drove him to create new products. One thing that all entrepreneurs must have is a clear and unwavering vision and plan for the future. They have to have a ‘why’ for their company. Dr. Polselli saw a need for better equipment to avoid some of the costly mistakes he saw in person as a radiologist, and that cause has motivated him ever since.

Ryan Polselli is “currently working to provide mutually beneficial research partnership with the academic community.”

Ryan Polselli On Youtube : BREAST CANCER AWARENESS AND MALE BREAST CANCER

Ryan Polselli: The Case for Better Breast Cancer Screening and Diagnosis

Ryan Polselli
Ryan Polselli

 

Ryan Polselli has devoted his career to creating better options for breast cancer screening and faster diagnoses. Dr. Ryan Polselli is the CEO and founder of MammoLink, a comprehensive and fully-customizable breast cancer detection system that has been used by doctors and physicians throughout the United States. Dr. Polselli saw a need in the healthcare system for more patients to get better breast cancer detection services to try and catch the disease before it causes serious complications like death.

Ryan Polselli at first developed “technical innovations and marketed several patented devices” he designed to help doctors detect early warning signs of breast cancer more effectively. These innovations were designed to reduce errors and generally improve the breast cancer screening and diagnostic experience. Many more lives can be saved every day with better screening practices and detection systems in place to help catch breast cancer before it becomes deadly.

Ryan Polselli and his wife Miranda live in Palm Harbor, Florida.

 

Ryan Polselli: Supporting Breast Cancer Awareness

Ryan Polselli entered the medical field as a Diagnostic Radiologist. He’s dealt with many complicated breast cancer cases in his long career, even implementing new ways of catching cancer before it spreads and causes serious complications. While working as the Director of Breast Imaging for Memorial Health University Medical Center in Savannah, Georgia, he “developed and implemented interventional breast MRI services and protocols including MRI guided breast biopsies.”

Ryan Polselli has spent his career helping women get the treatment they need for breast cancer and by catching breast cancer as early as possible. He contributes to breast cancer awareness organizations and research organizations working on how to cure or mitigate the deadly disease. Awareness is a large part of the battle. By now, almost everyone has heard of breast cancer awareness organizations and are aware of the risks and widespread problems it poses many of us. But, Dr. Polselli wants to go farther and see more women get regular screening to prevent the disease from taking still more lives.

More Link: Ryan Polselli is the CEO of MammoLink.

I was just diagnosed with Phyllodes Tumor of the Breast. What does this mean?

First, let me say that I do not want to interfere with your medical care and your relationship with your treating doctors. Your doctors are more familiar with the details of your case and I would be doing you a disservice to pretend otherwise. I defer to their expertise. Please make sure you follow up with your doctor.

My answer below to your question is intended to be for general informational purposes only and not medical advice.

However, generically speaking, I can provide you with a short overview of Phyllodes tumors and some of the more common considerations encountered by patients and physicians when treating these tumors and I hope that this information is helpful to you.

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First, Phyllodes tumors are relatively rare. Because of this, we don’t have too many large studies that enable us to fine-tune our evidence based medicine approach. Stated another way, we just don’t have as much experience with them as we do with other tumors. However, there are still a few things that almost everyone agrees upon that should be helpful to you.

In general, Phyllodes tumors (note alternative spellings and various pronunciations are common) can be relatively difficult to diagnose. They often look just like a fibroadenoma on ultrasound and mammogram and even when a biopsy is done, it can still be hard to determine specific characteristics of the tumor under the microscope. This is in part because Phyllodes tumors exhibit a spectrum of behavior from benign to malignant.

One of the most useful characteristics to determine how the tumor is behaving (benign versus malignant) is to look at how quickly the cells are dividing. The quicker the cells are dividing (generally referred to as mitotic rate), the more aggressive the tumor and the more likely it is malignant. Because cells may divide at different rates in different areas, it is useful to examine a larger area of tissue to get a more accurate overall impression. For this reason it is useful to have as much tissue as possible for examination.

However, mitotic rate is not the whole story, there are other very specific tissue characteristics which require special tests to be done on the tissue which can give clues about the tumor’s behavior. For this reason, it is useful to have an expert pathologist familiar with Phyllodes tumors make the diagnosis. Often, even with the best of circumstances, the Phyllodes tumor can only be classified as “middle grade” or somewhere between benign and malignant.

In any event, because of all of these considerations, it is widely agreed upon that the tumor should always be removed regardless of the initial impression from biopsy (whether benign, borderline/intermediate grade, or malignant). This is done by completely removing the tumor along with some surrounding normal breast tissue to ensure removal is as complete as possible (known as wide local excision). A surgeon with experience in removing tumors from the breast should be able to successfully perform the surgery.

After the tumor is removed, all of the tissue will be examined and a final diagnosis will be made about the tumor. About 10-25% of the tumors are determined to be malignant. However, most of the time the removal of the tumor alone is curative. A small percentage of the time the tumor returns and a second surgery is needed. In general, no other therapy other than surgery is recommended to treat Phyllodes tumors. The overwhelming majority of all patients with a diagnosis of Phyllodes tumors on biopsy do remarkably well.

I hope this helps.

For more information visit Ryan Polselli, MD, DABR website.

Mammogram Nonsense is Keeping me up at Night -by Ryan Polselli, M.D.

Last night I read the following question on a public Q & A forum:

Why are doctors still ordering mammograms when I’ve seen it reported in several reputable sources that mammograms don’t reduce cancer risk via early detection, and may cause cancer?

The question, from a non-medical professional, I thought, was fair. I understand that there is a lot of confusion among patients and the public about screening mammograms. However, one of my colleagues, an oncologist, attempted to answer this question and actually agreed with the premise! I was floored by his answer. What nonsense! I couldn’t sleep. How could any physician hold this belief? I tossed and turned for an hour. At 3 AM I went into my office to write my own answer. Here it is…

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Screening mammography is one of the biggest successes in modern medicine. Period. It is the poster child for a successful screening program. There is not an educated person in the world that can argue or would even attempt to argue that mammograms don’t save lives.

If you are a woman and you want to increase your chances for living longer, wear your seat belt, eat well, exercise, and…get your mammogram.

All major organizations in the United States and countries of the modernized world that have repeatedly analyzed the data have all come to the same conclusion and continue to recommend mammograms in order to save lives.

This includes the American Cancer Society, the United States Preventative Services Task Force, The American College of Radiology, Society of Breast Imaging, the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, among others.

Unfortunately, to answer part of your question, for reasons that are hard for me to understand, it seems that lately harmful hysteria and disinformation that flies in the face of science and logic have been shamefully making their way into cult culture and even to a degree mainstream medicine.

With all due respect, look no further than the former answer by one of my oncology colleagues. He says, “Routine mammography has resulted in a huge increase in the number of women diagnosed with breast cancer but no corresponding decrease in mortality.” This could not be further from what the overwhelming majority of evidence demonstrates.

For example, randomized controlled trials of women invited to screening mammography (traditional screen film) from 1963 to 2000 demonstrate early detection and treatment of breast cancer have reduced the proportion of late stage breast cancer and led to a 20–30% decrease in mortality among these women.

Additionally, more recent data using more modern equipment and techniques have demonstrated even larger gains. In some age groups and demographics, this results in a near 50% decrease in mortality. This data is now well established and has been reproduced multiple times in multiple studies in several countries throughout the world including the United States, Canada, and Europe. (Broeders, et al. 2012; Lee, et al. 2010; Oeffinger et al 2015; Siu 2016).

So why is there any confusion about this subject at all?

One possibility is that the ideal frequency and timing when women should obtain mammograms is not as clear cut as their well established effectiveness. That is not because they may not be doing their job, but that at some point, the more you screen, the less the screening returns any significant results and the more that screening may begin to result in harm.

For example, it does no good to screen for breast cancer with a mammogram every day, every week, or even every month. As the author of this question rightfully points out, a small dose of radiation is given to the breast with every mammogram and it’s very unlikely that anything will change on a daily, weekly, or even monthly basis. Additionally, mammograms can sometimes result in extra biopsies which turn out to be nothing to worry about. So a few organizations have started to try and tweak the traditional yearly mammogram recommendations. However, this does not mean in any way that mammograms don’t work and don’t save lives!

The first organization to tweak the traditional recommendations was the United States Preventative Services Task Force (USPSTF). This organization is the somewhat “rogue” group that for better or worse likes to challenge the status quo in the medical world. In 2009, they changed their recommendation to state that a woman should have a mammogram every other year beginning at age 50 instead of every year beginning at age 40.

Their recommendation was based largely on the fact that they didn’t feel the extra cancers that would be detected or the advantage of earlier detection with an annual regimen were worth the extra biopsies that would be needed and the anxiety that they would produce. It was not based on the number of lives saved nor focused on radiation to the breast. In fact, their data acknowledged that more women would die from their recommendations, but that the number was acceptably small and not worth what they consider harm largely in the form of anxiety from extra biopsies.

You can now understand why this recommendation sent shockwaves through the medical community and became (and remains) one of the most hotly debated decisions in modern medicine. If you are interested in more detail about this decision, read an article I wrote here:

What Really was Said at the Water Cooler in 2009: USPSTF Breast Cancer Screening Recommendations and Current Physician Practice Patterns.

One final note in conclusion to try to completely answer the question. It is true that mammograms do give a dose of radiation to the breast. The best data I have available to put this into perspective in terms of risk benefit for a patient is as follows:

The potential risk from radiation to the breast is the risk of inducing a fatal breast cancer. For a woman at the age of 65 this risk (from a single mammogram) is estimated to be 0.3 in 100,000 (Hendrick 2010).

However, the benefit is the detection and treatment of cancer before it is clinically apparent. In this age group the likelihood of this is about 1 in 500. Furthermore, the chance that this detected cancer would be fatal without a mammogram is about 1 in 4.

In short, if you do the math, the benefit to risk ratio for a mammogram in this age group is somewhere between 90:1 and 180:1.

As you can see, like I said in the beginning of this article, if you are a woman and you want to live longer, do not bet against odds like this and get your mammogram. I hope this helps clarify some of the mammogram nonsense floating around out there.

Ryan Polselli, M.D., Diplomate of the American Board of Radiology, Fellowship Trained Breast Imaging Radiologist

Please note that this blog is intended for general informational purposes only and is not intended to be medical advice.